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Interview with Claus Sørensen, Director-General of the Directorate-General Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection at the European Commission. April 2014

Migration Policy Centre Policy Brief

The Mediterranean Sea is the most porous border between Europe and its neighbours and the world’s most dangerous border between countries that are not at war with each other. Three facts emerge: sea routes to Europe are anything but new; places of embarkation and disembarkation have changed in relation to controls; and the risk of dying at sea has considerably increased over the last decade.
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European Union Case Studies

The European Union (EU) had spent over €2 billion distributed in humanitarian aid as of October 2014. This amounts to about half of humanitarian aid for the Syria crisis, with the rest covered by the United States and other countries. A Migration Policy Centre (MPC) research papers reviews the EU’s response to the Syrian crisis and tracks the numbers of Syrian asylum seekers.
Released in November 2012.
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The Mediterranean Sea is the most porous border between Europe and its neighbours and the world’s most dangerous border between countries that are not at war with each other. Another MPC paper, by Philippe Fargues and Sara Bonfanti, analyzes why migrants risk their lives crossing the Mediterranean and what Europe is doing about it
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During the collapse of Colonel Gaddafi’s regime in 2011, there were fears that millions of refugees could reach Europe’s shores. Yet only 30,000 refugees actually made it to Europe while millions poured into Libya’s neighbours.

According to the European Union, almost 150,00 Syrian refugees have declared political asylum in the European Union since the start of the current conflict in Syria, the majority in Germany and Sweden (see map below).

Meanwhile, more than 3 million refugees have entered Syria’s neighbouring countries.

Last year in Libya, we worried disproportionately about Libyan refugees reaching Europe. At this point we have a similar situation with Syria.
Kristalina Georgieva, European Commissioner for International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response, November 2012


Interview with Kristalina Georgieva, European Commissioner for International Cooperation

Filmed on 12 November 2012 in Paris, France.

 
 



Interview with Helene Flautre, Member of the European Parliament

“Only 4% of Syrian refugees are in Europe, primarily in Germany and other Northern countries, such as Sweden. So we ask Syria’s neighbours to open their borders, but we don’t do the same?”
Click below to read our full interview with Hélène Flautre (Strasbourg, 13 December 2012)
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